REVIEWS

More evaluative analyses of new (and re-) releases, revivals, restorations, and other notable films
REVIEW

(Chloe Okuno, USA, 2022)

By YONCA TALU  |  June 24, 2022

The toxicity of the male gaze has rarely been depicted on-screen with such chilling intensity as in Chloe Okuno’s debut feature Watcher. A refreshing take on the apartment thriller genre epitomized by films like Rear Window and Rosemary’s Baby, Watcher centers on Julia (Maika Monroe)… 

REVIEW

Arrebato (Rapture)

(Iván Zulueta, Spain, 1979)

Birthed during the cultural thaw that immediately followed the end of the Franco dictatorship, Basque writer-director and designer Iván Zulueta's 1979 feature Arrebato erupts like a massive discharge of so much repressed anxiety and despair.

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BY  LAURA KERN  |  Month 00, 2021

GUIDE | MODERN SLAYERS

Beast

(Michael Pearce, UK, 2017)

Beast is a lot of movies in one package - fractured fairy tale, belated-coming-of-age story, psychological drama, regional horror film - but above all it's a calling card for its leading lady, Jessie Buckley.

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BY  STEVEN MEARS  |  Month 00, 2021

REVIEW

Humongous

(Paul Lynch, USA, 1982)

In what could be the fastest-resulting rape revenge movie, a drunken lout brutally forces himself on Ida, the young woman who doesn't return his affections, during a party over Labor Day.

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BY  LAURA KERN  |  Month 00, 2021

GUIDE | MODERN SLAYERS

Beast

(Michael Pearce, UK, 2017)

Beast is a lot of movies in one package - fractured fairy tale, belated-coming-of-age story, psychological drama, regional horror film - but above all it's a calling card for its leading lady, Jessie Buckley.

READ MORE >

BY  STEVEN MEARS  |  Month 00, 2021

REVIEW
(Iván Zulueta, Spain, 1979)

Produced during the cultural thaw that immediately followed the end of the Franco dictatorship, Basque writer-director and designer Iván Zulueta’s 1979 feature Arrebato erupts like a massive discharge of so much repressed anxiety and desire.

BY JOSÉ TEODORO  |  October 31, 2021

REVIEW
(Damon Packard, USA, 2018)

The TV is always on in Fatal Pulse, the most recent release from underground horror legend Damon Packard. Set in 1991, Packard’s 2018 film is drenched in pinkish-bluish gel lighting, a movie-world glow enveloping all in its path—especially antihero Trent Dupont...

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BY CHLOE LIZOTTE  |  October 31, 2021

REVIEW
(David Prior, USA/South Africa/UK, 2020)

There is a lot of misdirection in David Prior’s ambitious, scary, and exhilaratingly convoluted The Empty Man. For its first 20 minutes it plays like lost-in-the-wilderness adventure horror, following a group of American friends...

BY MICHAEL KORESKY  |  October 31, 2021

REVIEW
(Chito S. Roño, Philippines, 2017)

Marriage and remarriage have forever been prominent motifs in the comedy genre. But with matrimonial success rates not exactly encouraging in much of the world, and divorce illegal in the Philippines, they’re equally suitable grist for the horror mill.

BY LAURA KERN  |  March 14, 2022

REVIEW
(Eskil Vogt, Norway, 2021)

As The Innocents opens, a family of four are in the car headed to a new home. In the back seat sit two sisters: the lightly freckled Ida (Rakel Lenora Fløttum), her intense stare much older than her 9 years, pinches her older, nonspeaking autistic sister, Anna (Alva Brynsmo Ramstad).

BY LAURA KERN  |  May 13, 2022

REVIEW
(Iuli Gerbase, Brazil, 2021)

Brazilian writer-director Iuli Gerbase’s debut feature begins with the whole of humanity being forced indoors by a pervasive vapor as deadly as it is seemingly innocuous. As days, weeks, months pass with no indication of when the rose-colored threat will recede, prolonged universal quarantine gives rise to a mental-health crisis.

BY JOSÉ TEODORO  |  March 1, 2022

REVIEW
(Sean King O’Grady, USA, 2021)

In late 2001, my girlfriend and I moved from New York to Austin, Texas. We had some friends who’d recently gone down there and we’d never been away from New York. We knew a lot—especially in those months following September of that year—but we didn’t know tornadoes.

BY WILLIAM BOYLE  |  October 31, 2021

REVIEW
(Jane Schoenbrun, USA, 2021)

I haven’t seen Jane Schoenbrun’s first feature, a 2018 documentary entitled A Self-Induced Hallucination. The film’s IMDb page offers a teasingly terse synopsis: “It’s about the internet, and it’s quite strange.”

BY JOSÉ TEODORO  |  April 20, 2022

REVIEW
(Kate Dolin, Ireland, 2021)​

Stories told within the framework of family drama can sometimes resemble folklore—digressive, dark, suspiciously elliptical, patent fabrications that only bear hints of an ancient truth that has since been lost to time.

BY VIOLET LUCCA  |  March 25, 2022

REVIEW
(Kate Dolin, Ireland, 2021)

Stories told within the framework of family drama can sometimes resemble folklore—digressive, dark, suspiciously elliptical, patent fabrications that only bear hints of an ancient truth that has since been lost to time. These two similar, alternately revealing and bewildering genres contain stories...

BY VIOLET LUCCA | March 25, 2022

REVIEW
(Kate Dolin, Ireland, 2021)

Stories told within the framework of family drama can sometimes resemble folklore—digressive, dark, suspiciously elliptical, patent fabrications that only bear hints of an ancient truth that has since been lost to time.

BY VIOLET LUCCA | March 25, 2022

REVIEW
(Iuli Gerbase, Brazil, 2021)

Brazilian writer-director Iuli Gerbase’s debut feature begins with the whole of humanity being forced indoors by a pervasive vapor as deadly as it is seemingly innocuous. As days, weeks, months pass with no indication of when the rose-colored threat will recede, prolonged universal quarantine gives rise to a mental-health crisis.

BY JOSÉ TEODORO  |  March 1, 2022

REVIEW
(Sean King O’Grady, USA, 2021)

In late 2001, my girlfriend and I moved from New York to Austin, Texas. We had some friends who’d recently gone down there and we’d never been away from New York. We knew a lot—especially in those months following September of that year—but we didn’t know tornadoes.

BY WILLIAM BOYLE  |  October 31, 2021