ESSAYS

A description of what the user will find here eg Musings and other good things
REVIEW

Arrebato (Rapture)

(Iván Zulueta, Spain, 1979)

Birthed during the cultural thaw that immediately followed the end of the Franco dictatorship, Basque writer-director and designer Iván Zulueta's 1979 feature Arrebato erupts like a massive discharge of so much repressed anxiety and despair.

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BY  LAURA KERN  |  Month 00, 2021

GUIDE | MODERN SLAYERS

Beast

(Michael Pearce, UK, 2017)

Beast is a lot of movies in one package - fractured fairy tale, belated-coming-of-age story, psychological drama, regional horror film - but above all it's a calling card for its leading lady, Jessie Buckley.

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BY  STEVEN MEARS  |  Month 00, 2021

REVIEW

Humongous

(Paul Lynch, USA, 1982)

In what could be the fastest-resulting rape revenge movie, a drunken lout brutally forces himself on Ida, the young woman who doesn't return his affections, during a party over Labor Day.

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BY  LAURA KERN  |  Month 00, 2021

GUIDE | MODERN SLAYERS

Beast

(Michael Pearce, UK, 2017)

Beast is a lot of movies in one package - fractured fairy tale, belated-coming-of-age story, psychological drama, regional horror film - but above all it's a calling card for its leading lady, Jessie Buckley.

READ MORE >

BY  STEVEN MEARS  |  Month 00, 2021

ARTICLE | ESSAY
The holiday-enlivened monster that is Halloween III: Season of the Witch

The way horror film series typically work is that the first entry is notable, for whatever reason—it’s a great movie, it’s popular, it infiltrates the news cycle/culture...

BY COLIN FLEMING  |  October 31, 2023

ARTICLE | ESSAY
David Gordon Green continues his assault on beloved horror franchises with a new Exorcist that only heightens the glory of Friedkin’s original.

Pauline Kael’s New Yorker review of The Exorcist was published the first week of January 1974, just after the film’s intentionally provocative Christmastime release. 

BY NICHOLAS RUSSELL  |  October 13, 2023

ARTICLE | ESSAY
Quentin Dupieux’s singular brand of outlandish humor reaches gory new heights with Smoking Causes Coughing.

For no apparent reason, at the start of Rubber (2010), perhaps Quentin Dupieux’s best-known film, a sheriff pops out of a car trunk...

BY LAURA KERN  |  March 31, 2023

ARTICLE | ESSAY
The Harbinger, the latest of Andy Mitton’s exquisitely heady—and horrifying—otherworldly explorations, is the only quarantine film we need.

High-concept, no-frills horror is writer-director-editor-composer Andy Mitton’s modus operandi. While his four features (the first two co-directed with Jesse Holland) address vaster subjects of death and the afterlife...

BY LAURA KERN  |  December 5, 2022

ARTICLE | ESSAY
The cannibalistic Bones and All fortifies, and darkens, Luca Guadagnino’s habitual seductive scenarios, in which heightened stylistics often cloud sexuality.

Bones and All—Luca Guadagnino’s latest monument to ill-fated love, based on the 2016 young-adult novel by Camille DeAngelis—begins with a slice of the quotidian... 

BY KELLI WESTON  |  November 23, 2022

ARTICLE | ESSAY
Cronenberg hallmarks may ripple through Crimes of the Future, but the director’s transcendent return offers fresh flavors of food for thought.

The opening image of David Cronenberg’s Crimes of the Future is arresting, enigmatic, exquisite, revealing an enormous capsized ship, long abandoned, surrendered to a second life...

BY JOSÉ TEODORO  |  June 7, 2022

ARTICLE | ESSAY
Looking back on the experience of Darren Aronofsky’s divisive masterwork and questions of misogyny in horror from a world unimaginably more surreal than the one we inhabited five years ago.

Over 20 years ago I made an agreement with Darren Aronofsky to never write about his work. It was the very end of the last century, in a charming fishing village in eastern Mexico...

BY LAURA KERN  |  June 7, 2022

ARTICLE | ESSAY
Acclaimed stars’ forays into horror roles are always revealing, and sometimes revelatory.

“You can lose everything else, but you can’t lose your talent,” proclaims “Baby” Jane Hudson (Bette Davis), a former child star plotting a doomed comeback. Robert Aldrich’s 1962 “Grande Dame Guignol” masterpiece What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? was hardly the first...

BY STEVEN MEARS  |  October 31, 2021

ARTICLE | ESSAY
Julia Ducournau’s feral serial-killer genre hybrid Titane seeks salvation in notions of domesticity

Consider Titane a reverse-slasher: not merely because in place of the usual murderous man-child in gender distress, fueled by psychosexual rage to terrorize mainly (or most enthusiastically) his female victims, we have a gender-bending woman serial killer...

BY KELLI WESTON  |  October 31, 2021